Nestled between the Cumberland Mountains and foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains. Campbell County offers a unique quality found in small communities. With a historic character, a temperate climate, friendly citizens, and a variety of recreational opportunities... Campbell County is a proud community.

People in Campbell County are involved. Pride in their work and the ability to influence their community provide the incentive for involvement. Volunteers have a chance to participate in many organizations and clubs. Contact the Chamber of Commerce at (423) 566-0329 or Email us.

Famous for the spectacular Cherohala Skyway at the southern tail of the Smokies. Bring the bike and coast down miles of winding roadways. Bring a friend or that someone special and enjoy hiking, fishing, camping and cabin rentals, shopping, and fine dining, amidst spectacular views from dawn to dusk. The Cherohala Skyway - A two-lane, forty-three mile long National Scenic Byway through Cherokee and Nantahala National Forests. Start out your journey at the Cherohala Skyway Visitor Center in Tellico Plains and discover the local museum, pick up last-minute gifts, and find a wealth of information about the area.

Sevier County has gone from being a quiet, rural area to the location of the most visited park in the nation aince the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, with its main entrance located in Gatlinburg. Nearby towns of Pigeon Forge and Sevierville have expanded their tourism offerings of attractions, restaurants, shopping, and accommodations to meet the demand. Today, the area is often called the "Little Vegas of the Smokies".

Two mountains - English & Bays; two rivers - Holston & French Broad; two lakes - Douglas and Cherokee; equate to an endless supply of recreational opportunities in Jefferson County, Tennessee.

A quiet and uncongested backdoor to the Smokies, Wears Valley and Townsend in Blount County are often referred to as the "peaceful side of the Smokies". Mary Blount, the very first First Lady of Tennessee, inspired the name of the county seat of Blount County. "Maryville" is located in the western foothills of the Great Smoky Mountains.

Located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of upper East Tennessee, Unicoi County is named after a Cherokee word meaning "fog draped." Unicoi's Cherokee Trail is nestled in the warm embrace of Appalachia, this Cherokee trail is a portal to a simpler time. Journey to this place, and you, too, will be transported and lifted to a mountaintop vista, gently swept to a sun-drenched valley below. Allow your feet to wander the Appalachian Trail, and let your mind wonder at the rich history of the land. Lose yourself in the natural beauty of this Valley Beautiful, and find yourself anew. Discover Unicoi County, Tennessee, and find what you've been missing. For the free-spirited, the land and water of Unicoi County offer challenges both physical and mental. Test your mettle along the churning whitewater of the Nolichucky River, or try your hand at casting a line in a winding mountain stream. Hike through the Cherokee National Forest and discover hidden waterfalls, or experience the magic and community along the county's 30-mile stretch of the Appalachian Trail. Hunting, biking, horseback riding "whatever your pleasure, you'll find it here. You can even hit the links at Buffalo Mountain Resort's 18-hole golf course.

Mahala "Big Haley" Mullins was the notorious matron of a clan of moonshiners that lived on Newman's Ridge. Her scandalous girth, gumption, and tenacity at moonshining both scandalized and amused many in her day. Kyles Ford WMAThe year of the first settlement of the area is uncertain. Some historians set the date at 1795 while others cite evidence of settlers receiving grants to the land much earlier. Predating all of these, however, were the people known as Melungeons who were encountered by French traders in the mountains of east Tennessee in the late 1600's. All evidence points to the fact that these unique people were long ensconced on Newman's Ridge when the first settlers made their way to the land now known as Hancock County. Hancock's relative isolation has preserved the beauty of the area, a rural quality, and many traditions of Appalachian culture. Kyles Ford Mussel Shoals Today, Hancock County's magnificent setting offers its visitors a new experience at every turn of the winding roads leading into this most isolated and tranquil county in the State of Tennessee. Explore the rich history and biodiversity of Hancock County as it stretches from Clinch Mountain on its southern border to Newman's Ridge and the Powell Mountains to the north where it lies against the southwestern border of Virginia. Start with a picnic at Elrod Falls, or enjoy the drive along the Clinch and Powell rivers, bearing witness to one of the world's most renowned and ecologically diverse bodies of water.

Folks in the Watauga River area know how to spin a good yarn so pull up a chair! Anecdotes are quite literally an art form in these here parts. The National Storytelling Festival is hosted annually at the International Storytelling Center in Jonesborough. Mark it on your calendar, it's an event not to be missed. But take note, it's open year-round. The word "Watauga" is said locally to be a Cherokee word meaning "beautiful river". Watauga also happens to be a city located in both Carter and Washington Counties of Tennessee. It's the name of the river bordering Johnson City to the north, and the name of the lake formed by Watauga Dam, however, it's most notable historically for the Watauga Association, an autonomous government formed by early settlers along the Watauga River. The county seat is Jonesborough. The largest city, Johnson City, is shared by three counties. The largest portion of Johnson City lies in Washington County. During the 1920s, Johnson City's ties to Appalachian Mountains bootlegging activity gave the city the nickname of "Little Chicago" . The annual "Little Chicago Blues Festival" is held commemorating the legends surrounding the Prohibition-era speakeasies and railroad glory days of Johnson City.

Known widely by NASCAR fans as home to Bristol Motor Speedway, Bristol is often the first city in Tennessee to greet travelers venturing south on I-81. Historically, Sullivan County is a place of many "firsts" when it comes to settlement of Tennessee and it's best known by Country Music fans as the birthplace of Country Music. "Rocky Mount," the home of East Tennessee's first pioneer settler, William Cobb, is located here in the little known town of Piney Flats. Rocky Mount served as the first capitol of the Southwest Territory for Governor, William Blount for two years before the capital was moved to Knoxville. Spend a morning on the golf course or take a hike at Bays Mountain Park and explore the wonders of the wildlife area. Trout fish on the Holston River, investigate a cave, or visit one of the many farmers' markets.

Not too far off the beaten track, stop off and enjoy Lake Watauga, Cherokee National Forest, the Appalachian Trail, and more. John Honeycutt was the first recorded settler of Johnson County. At his home on Roan Creek near Butler, Honeycutt introduced "southern hospitality" to the region, entertaining such notable persons as Daniel Boone and James Robertson, "The Father of Tennessee". Early settlers came in defiance of the English King's Proclamation Line that prohibited settlements west of the mountains because of the danger from the Indians and because the government could not provide adequate control, protection, and other government services. The first settlers here were mostly English but included many other groups including Scotch-Irish and Germans. The first settlement in what was to be Tennessee was at Trade.

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